Monday, March 30, 2009

Geologist Poses New Rune Stone Evidence


Author and geologist Scott Wolter's tome, The Kensington Rune Stone: Compelling New Evidence, will deal with his research into those strange rune stones that crop up now and again. As I have written about in Strange State: Mysteries and Legends of Oklahoma, the Sooner State has not only one but several runestones. I don't know yet whether Wolter's work will cover these as well, but I am curious to see his interpretation of the available data. One theory he has is that these Norse runes could have been left by Knights Templar, fleeing persecution in the old world by braving a new one - long before such a thing was known to exist. If you want to read more, you can check out his book or pick up a copy of (shameless plug) mine, in which I cover those discovered in Oklahoma.

5 comments:

paranenormalno said...

What language is this?

Cullan Hudson said...

Runes are the alphabetic expression of several ancient Germanic languages, particularly those of Norse people.

M. said...

This website also has some information on North American runestones (http://www.sunnyway.com/runes/americanstones.html). It has (finally) been updated. It is worth noting that most date the NA Stones to around 1000. It is known that a mini ice age sent Norse explorers in search of new lands and/or food.

RRRGroup said...

Rune markings appear to be the incoherent leavings of mad persons, a kind of quasi-ancient version of Twitter-tweaks.

Any meaning in those you've covered, Cullan?

RR

Cullan Hudson said...

The ones in Oklahoma have been translated (with some argument) by experts in the field. Most agree that a couple indicate dates and another indicates a land claim. However, the most famous is the Heavener runestone and it is still highly debated.