Thursday, April 23, 2009

One Question

The "Sistine Chapel" of prehistoric art, the Lascaux Cave in France, is breathtaking. They are thought to date to at least 15,000 BCE. Ancient, prehistoric (beetle browed, shuffling, grunting) 'cave men' created these images as tokens and pleas to the Gods of the Hunt....
Over the years the primary images seen have been of specific images. A horse like creature is one. They are often coupled with similar cave paintings from Australia, the SW United States and other locations. The general impression is a bored cave dweller simply rolled over in the dark cave and began painting on the walls. Indeed, that very image is portrayed in some books....
The truth, as if so often the case, can be much stranger the closer one looks. The images are large and scale UP the walls to the ceiling area.......this leads to the inevitable question.....how did they get up there?

1 comment:

RRRGroup said...

Primitive trampolines?

Seriously....the art is too sophisticated for the mind-set attributed to early man, as paleontologists and others have it.

And, as you note, why place those images so far above the earth-bound viewing sites that observers were tethered to?

Any studies dealing with that?

RR